Thursday, 15 November 2007

Social Workers


Official business first - Who is the proud winner of the Mother of Shrek First wordless Wednesday Winners button? Well to be honest i couldn't decide!! (I wont be so generous next week!) So everyone who entered can help them selves to this;

Made by Aunt of Shrek (Thank you sis x) And thank you DJKirkby for the idea!

I recently did a post on support from family and friends but we are also supported by a variety of professionals.
There are some professionals to whom it is just a job, and don’t really understand what they are dealing with (in terms of C that is).
Gone are the days where they could come into your house and have a cuppa and really get to know you, your child and your lives. Now problems are dealt with either by email or over the phone. Very rarely do I now see a professional in person.
Yes we sometimes give them a hard time, or rather the system a hard time. But it is not personal, and the ones who are good at their job know this.
Professionals come and go, the bad ones don’t always last as they cant cope (they actually give me more stress than C does!) and the good ones don’t always last as they get promoted, move on or get pregnant!
When a professional has left, if I then see one in the town (as the mother of Shrek I have my radar fully turned on, scanning for stray dogs, small children, bicycles and teenagers who want to torment, and how I am going to manage to keep walking in a straight line (any of these causes C to head bang) I usually spot them before they see us. When they do see us they pretend not to, or turn away or even turn round. I think they think I am going to lynch them or give them the latest update on C. But all I actually want is a smile, an acknowledgement that we did - do matter and exist.
But anyway. There are good professionals out there, They don’t pretend to be the experts, they listen to you and really support you. These are the ones who want to make a difference and do care. And their reward? Under paid, over worked and poor working conditions.

These professionals are usually the social workers and they get a bad press. The social workers whom if you haven’t tided your house, or if you say you are finding it hard to cope cart your children off into care! This is not the case, if it was C would be in a foster home by now! By having a social worker you are not admitting defeat, you maybe just need that extra support.
I have had a few very good social workers in my time, and I thank each of them for going that extra mile and making me feel like a human not a case file.

25 comments:

Anne Brooke said...

Lovely to know there are some good ones around, Casdok! My cousins wil be pleased - they're both social workers and do get a lot of stick!

Hugs

A
xxx

childlife said...

I'm so glad you posted about this... I think you really pegged it. It's so hard to get professionals to see your child as a living, breathing person instead of a name on a file. I've always made it my personal mission to do everything in my power to make sure that medical professionals see my children as children rather than a medical record number and a birth date.

The individuals who have meant the most to me were case workers or social workers. I have known some grand ones. I remember one social worker who would come in and fuss over my little girl in the hospital about how beautiful she was. Her kindness meant EVERYTHING - a moment of normalcy that I clung to when my whole world had been plunged into fear and chaos.

There are some truly good people in the Social Worker field that just don't get enough recognition for what they do. I add my applause to your lovely post for these lovely people.

Crystal Jigsaw said...

When Amy was first diagnosed, we received help from several professionals, all of which were understanding, gave me their shoulder, worked patiently with Amy and didn't bat an eyelid at coming into the house with a miserable old bastard looking on, i.e. Jim.

However, then it all went pearshaped. Amy reached school age. The help and support at home stopped as suddenly as it had started - a future blog about this - Amy was signed off two professional's registers, haven't a clue why to this day, and I was left to cope alone with a child who quite obviously needed assistance. I am afraid, therefore, my experience of professionals has been somewhat less gratifying than your own, Casdok. I think it is disgusting that we were treated in this way, that Amy, aged only 5 years old, was expected to just cope with her condition when these people knew full well that her mother, i.e. ME, needed support. I went to see the doctors, health visitor (waste of time), spoke to school teachers, attended parent groups (again a waste of time) and in the end I realised that no one is interested in what happens to either Amy or myself once the back door is closed.

Sorry to go on but you really touched a nerve here.

Best wishes, Crystal xx

Elizabethd said...

I agree, there are good ones. My daughter is one of those, works in Canada, and cares deeply about her 'people'. she travels long miles, sometimes in heavy snow , to see families.
However, I've come across the other sort many times as part of my ex job in UK.

Vi vi vi vooom!!!!!!!! said...

I'm proud of the social workers in this country, there really are some good ones out there, who are there to help. Along with health visitors, etc.

PI said...

It's good to hear something positive about social workers because, you are right, the press they have had in recent years has made them seem hateful creatures.

abstractjenn said...

And this is why in June I am starting Social Work school....really.

Christy said...

It pleases me to know there are good social workers out there. I have had the displeasure of working with several here in Delaware who should be ashamed of themselves. But I am sure like all professions there are those bad apples in the bunch. I'm glad you have found helpful ones.

Cait O'Connor said...

You are right, there are good and bad individuals in the caring professions. I was naive when I went into nursing as I thought that all nurses were angels. Unfortunately I was wrong but I'd say the good are in the majority.

Tom said...

We had the most wonderful social worker when Mikey was first diagnosed with PDD. She was an angel and really went the extra mile for our son. Then she died suddenly of a heart attack. Our new social worker is good but nowhere near as wonderful as our first one.

Suffolkmum said...

I'm also glad to hear that Social Workers can be great. My much loved Auntie was head of Social Work for a large British city for a number of years. She was sooooo dedicated and a wonderful person.

BBC said...

Right, some social workers are just there because they just fell into that work and it's a paycheck for them. Some are just there for a while as a path to somewhere else.

But some love the work and are dedicated to it, and you. But off the job they just want to be to themselves so I wouldn't take it personal if they avoided me on the street, I know they need time to just be another person, or shopper, or whatever.

Here is a smile for you. :-)

lampworkbeader said...

Unfortunately, often the service you get comes down to two basic things - time and money. The social workers don't have the time any more as their case loads are so huge, and there isn't any money to employ more.

Marla Fauchier Baltes said...

That is great you have good people helping you. We have never qualified for any help so we have no social workers. Here, our income is taken into consideration and we make too much for help. Seems wrong to me. In New Jersey we would had a casea worker and qualified for more services than I thought possible but then we moved again. Ugh.

Patti said...

it's good to read you have some people to help you and most importantly listen and show they care. It would be great if they could read this post.

Maddy said...

We still get social workers who visit the 'house.' But it's quite different out here.

I was delighted when the first one turned up [and she was great]. However, we worked on 'goals' = the most currently irksome issues at the time. Identify the 'issue' make plan of action......then she left and I was apparently the one who had to implement them!

I made sure that the following year I chose much 'lower' goals!
Cheers

BenefitScroungingScum said...

I'm so pleased to hear you've had such excellent social workers, I only wish I could say the same...they are my pet hate! Unlike doctors or nurses for whom every dreadful experience I've had a positive one to balance it out I can't come up with anything even vaguely pleasant to say about any of the social workers I've come across, though funnily enough some of the managers I've worked with have been superb, but completely unable to control the social workers, as you guessed it, only social workers can make decisions about social workers.
It's also not unusual (on average about 5 families a year in the UK I've seen since I've been diagnosed) for EDS families to have to fight social services to keep their children against false accusations of abuse, with medical reports, official diagnosis and specialist medical experts being ignored by the social workers, similar to the case in Norfolk where the family with a history of Osteogenesis Imperfecta had their oldest children forcibly adopted by the local authority who refused to even consider it as a possibility (it later turned out to be a vitamin deficiency but the family can never get their children back)
It is nice to hear of so many others having positive experiences as it seems to vary so much between local authorities and has such a huge impact on all our lives.
Bendy Girl

Sara said...

workers don't get much love...we are often expected to be "cure alls" and when goals aren't met, or miricles don't occure parents can become upset, angry and downright unhelpful. I'm glad to hear that you are happy and pleased with the services you've recieved for the most part.

captain corky said...

I was adopted and my parents were very pleased with the social worker that handled my case. There are some really good ones out there. Too bad that job doesn't pay better... But I guess the important jobs never do.

Shrink Wrapped Scream said...

I heartily agree, social workers usually enter that profession for the right reasons, but being human, even those who care are mostly broken by a caseload of priorities that can't include those not at immediate risk. I've been fighting for three years now for a replacement social worker for Sam. He did have one once (for three months), but he was moved up in to adult sevices, and there is no one available to fill his shoes..

Rhonda said...

I think sometimes the "bad" ones ruin it for the others...
although I do have a friend who is a social worker and "they" told her she was involved way too much and that she should get through more cases per day.
SAD.

Cowgirl said...

So know what you mean. There are good workers and bad ones in just about any field you care to think about but care workers of course have a much more direct impact on us and our loved ones.

When Dad was needing to have his stump dressed (he cut his finger off a couple of weeks back) he was asked by the District Nurse if someone could drive him into town to their base - when the whole point of them is to visit rural areas to "do" people at home! Go figure!!!

Daisy said...

Great post, and YES--a good social work is worth their weight in gold!

Eileen said...

Thank you! Being a Social Worker since 1985 has brought me a great deal of joy. I hope I am considered "one of the good ones" because I care so much about the people I work with. I really do. I hate that people still view us, as "people who want to take your children away." Nothing could be further from the truth!! I love connecting and supporting my families!
XOXO

akakarma said...

A big hand for Social Workers and all who treat people like.... people!