Wednesday, 24 October 2007

How do you see the world?


I found this topic interesting as I haven't really looked into it before.
You may be relieved to hear this may be the last time I will be asking you questions about your senses! My conclusion tomorrow!
(Unless there are any others you can think of that you would like me to try and cover?)


Some people on the autistic spectrum – appear to have problems seeing things clearly. To them the world may seem disjointed, confused and scary.For example, people and things may seem blurry, move around or even disappear.

Visual symptoms of autism can include lack of eye contact, staring at spinning objects or light, fleeting peripheral glances, side viewing, and difficulty attending visually. C does all this!
Autistic people often use visual information inefficiently. They have problems coordinating their central and peripheral vision. Ie when asked to follow an object with their eyes, they usually do not look directly at the object. Instead, they will scan or look off to the side of the object. Autistic people might also have difficulty maintaining visual attention.
Motor, cognitive, speech, and perceptual abilities can also be affected when visual processing is interrupted.

We see colour is all around us. It is a sensation that adds excitement and emotion to our lives. Some autistic people can be sensitive to colours. Everything from the cloths we wear, to the pictures we paint revolves around colour. Without colour the world would be a much less beautiful place. Colour can also be used to describe emotions; we can be red hot, feeling blue, or be green with envy.
Without light, there would be no colour.

So do you know how you see things?

Can you read the number in these circles?


























37 comments:

Elizabethd said...

It is sometimes hard to realise that not all of us see the same things. Wouldnt it be odd though, if we were all exactly the same?

Tera said...

I'm just glad that I'm not blind. I live for sunny days that make the sky blue and the flowers spring out in color. And I sometimes know what it's like not to focus enough to see...when my mind is going a hundred miles a minute (like an autie), I can't focus on any one thing at all...it just becomes a blurred mass.

KittyB said...

Another fascinating trip through your recent blogs - I learn so much from you. Having no experience directly of autism, I'm sadly ignorant of all these issues you raise - but I'm grateful to you for opening my eyes.

her indoors said...

that first photo has me all of a quiver!
i saw all the numbers so i am not colour blind phew, you wouldnt think so if you saw some of the clothes i wear lol

BBC said...

Interesting, flies don't see the world as we do either. Like a fly would know what you are.

Thankfully I'm not color blind. And if I am I'm thankful for it because it makes you look beautiful. :-)

Self employed mum said...

Hi Casdok, still reading, very informative. As kittyb said you are opening our eyes. I now never assume a child is uncontrollable, but firstly assume they have special needs, if that's an ok term to use. We went to the cinema recently and a child started kicking my sons chair, I ignored it, as his parents immediately told him to stop, when it continued I turned around and smiled at the parents, they very politely apologised and moved back a row so that he could kick an empty chair. I was proud that my first thought wasn't, what a bloody nuisance!

Marla Fauchier Baltes said...

My daughter is very sensitive to light and color. She takes sunglasses with her most of the time and will insist on sitting in our house with no lights on most of the time. I crave bright sun and light! We often differ on this and it can make me go crazy in my own house. But, I know she struggles with it more than me so she wins!

Nancy said...

cas, I love your posts, enlightening those of us who have no idea the degrees of autism. I have learned more since I began reading your blog than any "educational" site out here on autism. Maybe because your's is written with love.

Elissa said...

I love having colour in the world (thankfully I'm not colour blind - I can see the numbers!!!).

The photo of the eye is amazing!

Christy said...

That photo is freaky!

I could read all the numbers very easily in the circles; that surprised me.

I have MS and my optic nerves are damaged. I can see well but am VERY sensitive to light and get horrible migraines.

To see things disappear or to see people as blurry figures would be so frustrating!

mommy~dearest said...

That is the most disturbing picture...

Kellan said...

oooh - without light, there would be no color - I've never thought about that before! I can't see a number in one of those pictures - is there a number in each one? I appreciate learning more about autism - it's good for everyone to understand and keep talking about it. Good post - thanks.

Cait O'Connor said...

Yes I can see all the numbers but my husband is colour blind and no doubt will have trouble, I will ask him later.

Chopski said...

I try to see a bit of humour in everything. Unfortunatley this can upset some people sometimes! Hey Ho!!

Paul F. said...

I can't see the numbers except on the last one.

Sara said...

hmmm it often makes me wonder how they do see things. All of our eye testing is based on what the person who sees tells us. For example, the poster on the wall that we need to read that has smaller and smaller letters. With non verbal, we don't know how they actually see that sign. I know when I watch N how he will look periferially, or avoid with his eyes, but I don't know how his vision actually is. Makes me wonder.

Cheri said...

Pattern generalization was especially strong for Zach (probably still is). Most people outgrow believing that they really are seeing people/monsters in shadows when they are young, but it took Zach longer. His couselor decided it was a sign of schizophrenia. Even afer I explained to him what Zach had seen, he still refused to back down. I was happy when Zach was no longer this guy's client.

That picture freaks me out. I hope the model got paid plenty. That eyeball looks so dry.

Rhonda said...

ahh great post.
Knowing how I see things is important. It helps me know who I am.
But, the clincher is, trying to understand how others see things...
that's what relationships are all about.

thanks for this!

Casdok said...

Self employed mum....well done!!!

Crystal Jigsaw said...

We are currently going through a purple phase where everything has to be purple. Amy doesn't see the world as a typical child of course but she does function highly.

Crystal xx

Ian Lidster said...

I find your blog so enlightening.

Anne Brooke said...

I can do those coloured numbers, but I can never ever do the magic eye stuff - no matter how hard I try!

A
xxx

Wooly Works said...

Amazing insights. My best friend and her family moved here to America from Rugeley in Staffordshire in order to have more freedom in dealing with their autistic son. Here, a family must go to the courts to establish guardianship once the disabled child becomes an adult. The family must prove that the individual is a danger, either to himself and to others in order to be granted guardianship. It's a terribly expensive process but many go through it because the laws here say that an individual has the right to engage in self injurious behavior if they so choose, even if their inability to make healthy adult choices is part of the disability. They call this the "least restrictive environment" and it is held as sacred in the world of the disabled. I sympathize with your situation. My friend's life is completely engaged in her child as well. She has felt that he is also seen as a freak, but has found a very supportive group of people here who volunteer to look after him in order to give her some time away. (He is 14) Unfortunately, the technical knowledge of autism and its causes is far behind what England has to offer. The focus here is on management and living skills, rather than finding ways to correct the disabilities and enhance the abilities.

Interesting information and so helpful. I'm passing on your blog address to my friend. We affectionately refer to my friend's son as a young man with possibilities. Thanks for your similar perspective!

DJ Kirkby said...

Having to make eye contact makes me twitchy but yes I can see the numbers.

QUASAR9 said...

So Casdok,
are the last five, five of this weeks winning lottery numbers?

I guess if you have difficulty focusing or paying attention, it must be a bit like trying to adjust the colour on a tv set when you are colour blind, or waking up in a haze and not quite with it, and trying to make sense of the world.

Big Dutch said...

casdok,

You're teaching a handsome American a lot of things. I could see all of the numbers and dream in full-color. My respect for you as a parent grows every day. You must be very strong in many dimensions. My salute to you!

Dutch

buffalodickdy said...

I could see the numbers- and I have a "red" aura. I could retake it in the morning and it would be different!

Top cat said...

We know that blind people's senses are heightened. I often wonder if people with autism see things we don't because one or more of their senses are heightened. Perhaps when it appears they are staring at something they see something we can't, same with communication.
Just a thought because it would appear they can be in their own world, perhaps there is another world, one we can't see.
I know it sounds a bit out there but we know some people can have ESP, anything is possible.:)
tc

Maddy said...

I have to claim 'cheatdom' on this one as my uncle was an opthalmic optician so these were play things for us.

More generally, I see things blurrily, either because I'm in a rush or more often because my bifocals are filthy!
Cheers

Jeni said...

Keep posting, opening people's senses to all these things. I never realized about the visual aspects of autism before. And, that's just for openers.

Holly said...

I'm about to read a book called Crashing Through, about a man who after losing his sight at 3 years old, has a surgery to regain his vision. Apparently, he found some aspects very difficult, more so than being blind. But, I haven't read it yet, so that's all I can say.

Jade said...

Amazingly we all see the world in a different way. Its really quite wild yet wonderful. :-)

Patti said...

I can read all the numbers. And I agree with others that it's interesting how we all see things differently.

Samantha said...

The Chubbs has a condition called Meres Irlen (probably not spelt right) which means he views the world in a very different way. His eyes are actually tinged yellow due to the condition. He has problems with colours and distances, and finds it hard to read as letters can just dance right off the page! I like to imagine it's like living inside a crystal :)

Satire and Theology said...

I have taken that test in a book before while in England, but could not see all the numbers. I can see all the numbers presented here though. There is a colour blind test on the web and midway through a picture of a scary creature appears. I suppose it is supposed to be a joke.

Cheers.

frog ponds rock... said...

I can see all the numbers, the third one down was hard though. Is it a 6?
Thanks for helping me think outside the square... cheers. kim

Casdok said...

Yes it is!
And thank you for reading!