Monday, 1 October 2007

Antony Gormley

Recently i went to the Antony Gormley exhibition in London. His sculptures spoke to me, i was in
awe.



To me they visually showed how i think C feels and sees the world.



Blind Light (2007), a luminous glass room filled with dense mist. From the outside, you can observe people vanish as they enter the brightly lit room and are enveloped by the mist, eventually emerging as shadows as they come close to its walls. Inside, you can lose yourself in light and vapour, with visibility down to as little as two feet. It was really weird to go inside.


C spends all his life being observed. And he watches, even though you cant see him watching!




The allotment here, represents Cs want for things being the same,
orderly and routined.







C is highly sensitive to touch, light smell, colour, atmosphere, taste.


It can be over whelming to him at times.


I think this shows graphically how his senses are attacked.


C head bangs.

And sometimes i feel like im hitting my head against a brick wall.







This is one of Antony's most famous works, The Angel of the North.

C is my angel.

57 comments:

Attila The Mom said...

Wow, that's just incredible! Thanks so much for posting it!

Lady in red said...

very thought provoking glad you found comfort in this exhibition

UN PEU LOUFOQUE said...

Very interesting work, I like the concept of room.

Blossomcottage said...

I had seen the Angel but knew nothing about the artist, thank you so much for enlightening me.
Blossom

Lightning Bug's Butt said...

Who is C? Clint? Chet? Cindy? Constance? Clancy? Clementine? Chuck?

Hannah Velten said...

Antony is a huge hit in our house, but seeing his work from a different perspective is truly enlightening - thank you. Mootia x

Suffolkmum said...

I LOVE Anthony Gormley too - I'd love to see the exhibition. Intersting and apt analogies with C's experiences.

WesterWitch/Headmistress said...

Oh I love the Angel of North - it is awe inspiring. Like Blossom I knew nothing about the artist though. Now I am very interested . . . I hope his work comes to Scotland otherwise it is unlikely I will see it . . .I hate leaving my hills.

Elissa said...

Thanks so much, what brilliant work and what an insightful post!
Elissa xx

captain corky said...

You're such a caring and thoughtful mom.

Vi vi vi vooom!!!!!!!! said...

You described it all so well!

gautami tripathy said...

That is poetry in glass sculpture. Glad I landed up here.

Suzy said...

Whenever I see that sculpture now, it will always bring me to think of C.

Thank you...

Suzy

Rhian / Crowwoman said...

these are wonderful!!!!
Thank you so much for popping by my blog and leading me back here.
The first sculpture and how you relate it to how your son sees the world adds even more power to the impact of that sculpture to me.

BBC said...

I was talking to a friend recently, a retired library director that has read a lot. And he said that babies are overwhelmed with senses and sounds and such when they are born.

So their brains as much as detune themselves so that they don't sense so much because it is all so overwhelming. This is why some people use drugs, it wakes up some of those senses. Wake up to many of them of course and they have very bad experiences, even kill themselves at times.

Maybe for some reason some brains fail to detune and they live in a sort of overwhelming hell? Who would want their senses so keen that they had to put up with feeling their hair grow? I think it would drive me nuts.

Merelyme said...

wow...thank you for introducing me to this amazing artist!

dgibbs said...

"He watches even though you can't see him watching"

My guy has done that a lot too.

buffalodickdy said...

The concept of that room is genius!

BBC said...

Are you aware of the Clear Blue Water comic? I've followed it for some time. They have an autistic child.

Clear Blue

mommy~dearest said...

Awesome post- thank you for sharing!

Crystal Jigsaw said...

That is incredibly fascinating, Casdok.

Crystal xx

MY OWN WOMAN said...

I have read about autism, I have seen autistic patients in the ER; but NEVER have I understood someone with autism as you have shown me in this posting. Thank you so much.

Milla said...

That was lovely, C. The last sentence brought tears to my eyes.

Jenni said...

I bookmarked your blog the other day after you commented on mine because autism is something which intrigues me. I have two cousins who are diagnosed PDDNOS and I had an autistic student in one of my co-op classes. It seems to me that autistic people have much to teach us if we are willing to look closely enough.

This post was amazing. It gives a very personal and real look at what an autistic person might feel. It also made me look twice at an artist whose work I would not have appreciated otherwise. I would normally have dismissed his work as too modern and wondered how some of it is even art. I suppose both autistic and artistic people deserve a closer look. We miss so much when we judge too quickly.

I look forward to reading more of your blog and getting a glimpse into your son's life and yours.

Casdok said...

Am very happy have got you all thinking!!!!

Ed said...

I like this artist and your comments about his work. I am continuing to enjoy all your posts. Thanks :)

BostonPobble said...

What a brilliant opportunity for you and other people who love people with autism! Thanks for sharing. And thanks for the visit over to mine. :)

Anonymous said...

You have a very bright son i think he is musically gifted see him everynow and then when i am working and i know you take care of him.

Casdok said...

Thank you! Hes kept that one quiet from me!!!

@themill said...

Love Gormley's work too and always feel a sense of local pride whenever I see the Angel.
Lovely blog

Top cat said...

What a wonderful exhibit and your thoughts comparing them to C's is thought provoking.:)
tc

toby said...

Have you considered forwarding this post to Antony Gormley? I'm sure he would appreciate the unique relevance of his work to your son's (and many other's) experience of the world.

Casdok said...

Now thats an idea! I will keep you posted!

Casdok said...

Cant find any contact details for him...anyone any ideas?

DJ Kirkby said...

Ah you write such beautiful posts. I would have liked the mist room...very much.

dawn said...

That would be an awesome place to visit. This is a great post in photos and explanation of you view of your son's world. Thank you for sharing this.

Nancy said...

You have shown us readers, how you are one with C, so in tune.

A beautiful and artistic way of giving us an understanding of your son.

jillie said...

I really liked the illusion of the top exhibit. Very cool indeed. Thanks for stopping by and I promise, my posts are not always that gross...haha!

;o)

violet_yoshi said...

Did you go into the Blind Light exhibit? I think it'd be fun, but then I also think I might freak out not being able to see anything but white for miles. Then again, it also could be kind of peaceful. It's a really interesting idea, and experience. Do you think his exhibition would come to the States?

Beth said...

You observed that exhibition through the eyes of mother love. And taught me to better understand your son and others.

Little Wing said...

Beautiful post my friend.
Beautiful photos and what a beautiful lady who gave us this post.

kirayoshi said...

I like cubes too, that's why I like Robyn's video clip of the song 'with every heartbeat', nice cubes and cylinders and colors.

Marla Fauchier Baltes said...

That looks amazing. I wish I was there to see that!

Ms.L said...

Ohh those are so wonderful,thank you for sharing.

My daughter has ADHD which I read somewhere has been linked with Autism. I'm not sure of the details but I can relate to some of the things you're talking about.
It was also thought that I had autism as a kid,only back then they said I was "disturbed" love that;)

Shari said...

How cool is that? I wonder how the room felt? Was it misty? Foggy? Warm? Cool? Comfortable? Hmm.

Thanks for sharing. :)

deb said...

The person with all the prickles sticking out reminds me of my middle daughter.

Mary-LUE said...

This post packs a strong punch. It communicates so much with a few words and pictures. Amazing.

JUST A MOM said...

I am late in responding ,,, I love your blog and your son is beautiful. I am glad you stopped by nice to meet you..

I will stop again and please feel free to come by my boring place.

MY OWN WOMAN said...

One of the doctors I work for in the ER has a 18 year old autistic son. I'm sure I don't need to tell you step by step what his parents and he have been through.

Generally at work, we don't talk about it. Sometimes I ask how "T" is doing and I get the generic answer that he expects we want.

Yesterday, and I hope you don't mind; I brought in your post "Antony Gormley." He was overwhelmed that I acknowledged that he had a son that he loved and that I acknowledged what a difficult yet wonderful road he endures.

During the slow moments, he opened up to me a little and told me of his son and the trials and triumphs he has encountered. I was able to tell him that I have never known as clearly what autism must be like for the child. Again, I needed to thank you for allowing me to see "C" thus allowing me to see "T."

Casdok said...

Of course i dont mind!!
Im am so chuffed to hear that!

Randy said...

For some reason, that room sculpture reminds me of a dream I had a couple of years ago. My oldest son was able to communicate via tablets made of clear plexiglass. If I recall correctly, he would speak and his words would appear on the tablets--in Hebrew. I don't speak or read Hebrew, so, despite this marvelous technological advance, I still couldn't understand what he was trying to tell me.

Anonymous said...

Has he kept quite when he has his fingers in his ears and making noises, he is blocking the noise so he can concentrate on the next overture *) !!!

Casdok said...

Ohhhhh!!! Hes so clever isnt he!!
Thank you for that insight!

Lesley Rigby said...

I recently went to the seafront at Crosby, Liverpool to see Anthoney Gormley's statues. I will never look at them again without thinking of Autism. Your description really made me want to cry.

Omega Mum said...

Really lovely. Thanks

Omega Mum said...

Really lovely. Thanks

Gary said...

Very moving.

I'd be interested to know what you make of this video on my friend Ian's photograpy blog (go to the clock and start the video): clock video